October 23, 2014
culture and tradition

Saganing Powwow pics and facts

Tim Barnum
Female dancers line the edge of the powwow arena during a round dance, in which men and women line up along the edge of the circle and dance in opposite directions, coming together during the dance.
Tim Barnum
Two young men make their way around the powwow arena during an Intertribal dance.
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As part of a two-step dance, which requires dancers to have a partner, dancers form a tunnel for partners to pass through.
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Paulie Gomez, a member of the SCIT who lives in Mount Pleasant, displays his fancy feather dancer regalia.
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Melissa Snyder (right) helps Richard Wozniak, a member of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe, get his traditional men's dancer regalia on. Melissa is wearing traditional women's dancer regalia.
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Jesse Elizable, back, wearing grass dancer regalia, and Richard DeLaCruz, front, in fancy dancer regalia, take part in an Intertribal dance.
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Dancers make their way around the arena during an Intertribal dance.
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Dancers perform and Intertribal dance.
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Kevin Chamberlain (left) and powwow emcee Brian Loney perform a hand drum song for a round dance.
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Native American traditional music ensemble Great Lakes Alliance performed songs for the powwow dancers.
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Elwood Fuhr paints a wooden Bald Eagle painted by Dennis Maher. The two were vendors at the powwow.
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Amber Sheahan, 11, poses for a photo with her little brother Akiiwaande Makwa Sheahan, five, whose name means "brown bear." Amber's is dressed in fancy dancer regalia while Akiiwaande's is grass dancer regalia. They live in Mount Pleasant.
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By Tim Barnum|Staff writer
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The Saginaw-Chippewa Indian Tribe (SCIT) held its Traditional Powwow to honor the Saganing Reservation in Standish Township on June 6-7. Members of the SCIT came together with members of other tribes and non-Native American guests to perform traditional dances, don authentic regalia, enjoy true native food, make crafts and educate all in attendance on the heritage and culture of the Saginaw-Chippewa Indian Tribe.

Powwow facts
Courtesy Powwow program
The importance of dance


Music and dance are representatives of the full range of life for American Indians. They are integral fuels that have always fed the fires of honor and traditions. American Indian dance is not a form of mindless amusement. It is a form of praise, worship and a way to experience interconnectedness through motion.

The drum


The drum has played a huge role in the Native American ceremony and culture as well as becoming as icon of their people. Drums have been used for thousands of years in every country for healing, dancing, chanting and singing. The drum becomes an extension of the drummer through use, love, vibration and even the oil from the hands that is absorbed.

Powwow vocabulary


Saganing: By the lake/At the lake
Pinconning: The place of many potatoes
Sagamok: Cross roads
Zhuna: Money
Chi Miigwetch: Thank you
Daga: Please
Aaniin ezhi-ayaayan?: How are you?
Boozhoo: Hello

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